h2

Articles

Parvo Discovered In Ojai Coyotes

By Misty Volaski

Wildlife is not an unusual sight around Ojai —- indeed, it is part of the valley’s charm. By now, most people know the best way to live together with the wildlife is to observe from a distance and keep pets away.
But, that’s not enough anymore. The wildlife — coyotes and raccoons, especially — are getting smarter.
And sicker.
In July alone, the Humane Society of Ventura Count, based in Ojai, was forced to euthanize three coyote pups due to advanced parvo infections.
Parvo — which is easily transferred from coyotes to dogs — affects the animal’s intestinal lining and vital organs, causing diarrhea, vomiting, lethargy, fever and, in some cases, death.
“Parvo can become epidemic if we don’t vaccinate our animals,” said Jolene Hoffman, Humane Society shelter director. “We have to be very careful right now.”
The Humane Society works closely with the Ojai Raptor Center, which brings infected animals to either be treated or euthanized at the Humane Society. They also keep in touch with local vets to track any patterns that might emerge.
The three parvo-infected coyotes were found in the East End of Ojai near Grand Avenue and Gridley Road, and Hoffman said there have been reports of an adult female with parvo-like symptoms in the same area. “We just haven’t caught her yet.”
In the pet world, there have been a few suspected cases seen by Humane Society employees, but none confirmed. Hoffman was forced to turn away a litter of dog pups recently. “They had no function in their back legs,” she said.
Another concern of Hoffman and crew: raccoons with distemper. Also a highly contagious illness, distemper begins like a cold, with the animal getting a runny nose and “goopy eyes, and trouble breathing,” said Hoffman. “Then they begin walking in circles, lose mobility of their back legs, then the front legs. Then they go down.”
Badgers, too, are susceptible. One was brought up from Ventura last month with what Hoffman suspected was distemper.
Like parvo, pets can become infected by distemper quite easily. Something as simple as drinking from the same water bowls can spread the infection quickly. Hoffman recommends bringing in both pets and their food and water bowls at night. “If you’re going to keep the bowl outside, dump the water and turn the bowl over.”
There is a vaccine for both parvo and distemper, which most dogs receive with their puppy vaccines at 6, 9, 12 and 16 weeks of age. Keeping vaccinations up to date is the surest method of prevention, Hoffman said.
She cautioned that while neither illness is transferred to humans, “… the vet bills you incur sure will! Be responsible. Keep your pets and food bowls inside at night, especially. And remember, coyotes are out in the daytime, too.”
If you see an animal behaving erratically or with the symptoms above, stay clear and call the Humane Society at 646-6505.
Hoffman has also received reports of coyotes surrounding and chasing people walking their small dogs, and recommends carrying a quick-release umbrella to “shield you and your dogs against the coyotes.”

Wildlife is not an unusual sight around Ojai —- indeed, it is part of the valley’s charm. By now, most people know the best way to live together with the wildlife is to observe from a distance and keep pets away. But, that’s not enough anymore. The wildlife — coyotes and raccoons, especially — are getting smarter. And sicker. In July alone, the Humane Society of Ventura Count, based in Ojai, was forced to euthanize three coyote pups due to advanced parvo infections. Parvo — which is easily transferred from coyotes to dogs — affects the

Register to read more...

Advertise on our site

Overview
Packages
Register